What’s the sitch with fees?

Image: weknowmemes

With the census date fast approaching for standard semester 1 subjects, what’s the sitch with paying fees and how do I go about this?

Not to worry – this blog post will give you a general overview on such matters.

Disclaimer: Read this blog post with a grain of salt.

I have done my research to make sure that the info in this post is accurate to this date, but I want to be super clear that Unimelb Adventures is no 13 MELB! Things change around the uni quite often, especially at a time like this. For all ‘official’ information, head to Ask.Unimelb.

Please take this blog post as a guide :)

So, here are some common questions about fees:

Q1. What’s the census date?

The census date is the last day you can withdraw from a subject without paying for it. It also means that you need to pay your fees by that date.

The census date is usually a month after the semester starts, but the date does vary so you should check your statement of liability/invoice (see Q3).

Q2. What happens if I withdraw from a subject before/after the census date?

If you withdraw before the census date, you won’t have to pay for the subject and it will not show up on your academic transcript.

Withdraw after? Then you will have to pay for the subject. It will show up on your academic transcript with ‘WD’ next to your subject (WD stands for withdrawn).

There is also another deadline – the last date the withdraw without fail. You can find out this date on the handbook, and if you withdraw after this deadline – you still pay for the subject, and it will show on your transcript with a fail next to the subject.

More info:

– What must I do before each subject census date?
– Withdrawing after the census date.

Q3. How do I pay my fees?

You’ll need to download your student invoice or your statement of liability off the portal. These documents tell you how much your subjects cost, how to pay them, and when to pay them by.

They used to send out hardcopy invoices to everyone, but they’ve switched it to online now. If you check your student emails and search for ‘Student Invoice’ you should find email with more info.

I will go through step-by-step how you can access those documents, but first I will explain the difference between a student invoice and a statement of liability.

Q4. Student invoice vs. statement of liability?

Ha.

So this student invoice thing is new in 2015. It’s almost exactly the same as your statement of liability – but slightly different (you know, just to mess with you).

The invoice only lists fees that are due during a particular invoicing period (such as semester 1 fees, semester 2 fees etc.). Whereas, the statement of liability lists all unpaid fees for the year.

They are essentially the same thing except one shows you fees for the whole year, and the other only for a specific period.

Why not combine the two forms into one? Geez.

More info:

What is the Student Invoice?
What is the Statement of Liability?
How can I check my fees and payment

Q5. How do I access these documents?

At this moment of time, the link to access your student invoice is on the homepage of the portal. It’s a pretty straight forward process, but here’s a step-by-step guide on how to download your invoice:

Click on ‘Access my Student Invoice’ etc. 

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 11.03.40 pm

 Click on ‘invoice’ on the drop down menu

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 11.04.07 pm

Then click on the most recent invoice

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 11.04.22 pm

Now, the link to the invoice will not always be on the homepage of the portal. So if want to access your student invoice at other times of the year, or view other fee-related documents like your statement of liability, here’s the old-fashion way:

Click on ‘Student Admin’

Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 12.24.58 am

Scroll down to fees

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 11.28.32 pm

Here you go!

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 11.29.21 pm

Q6. What is this Student Services & Amenities Fee thing?

The Student Services & Amenities Fee (or SSAF for short) is a compulsory fee we all have to pay. It varies if you’re a full time or part time student. You can defer it by submitting a ‘SA-HELP’ form (see next question).

Q7. How do I defer my fees?

If you are eligible to defer your fees, you can do so here:

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 11.50.14 pm

You’ll need to add a new form, then follow the prompts.

Q8. What happens if I don’t pay my fees on time?

There is a late penalty fee of $100 for each(!) due date.

Q9. I am still lost, where can I get help with fees?

It can be difficult getting your head around fees and whatnot, especially in first year. I know I certainly had no clue what I was doing back in first year with paying fees etc.

Here are some places you can go to for help/advice:

13 MELB

You can get in touch with 13 MELB in a number of ways. They are generally pretty quick to answer questions on social media, but bear in mind that if you need to discuss things that involve your personal information – it’s best to talk to them over live chat or over the phone – https://ask.unimelb.edu.au/app/contact.

Your student centre

If you have the patience or time to wait in line for god knows how long, your student centre is the go-to place. Bear in mind that your student centre may have moved (ha yay fun times). See here to see where your student centre has moved to – http://studentcentre.unimelb.edu.au/.

Student Admin at Baldwin Spencer

I would suggest going to Student Admin first rather than your student centre about fees. The folks at Student Admin are more specialised in this area. They’re located on the ground floor of Baldwin Spencer, near Union House.

Financial Aid

Or if are having financial difficulties, financial aid is your friend. As Joey mentioned in a previous blog post, they offer student loans that are interest-free. More info – http://services.unimelb.edu.au/finaid.

I hope this post has been helpful and that you feel less confused about fees etc.

– Daphane

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